Spider Wall Clock

cdr-me-snider-spider-wall-clock-tccm.jpgPhoto: Courtesy The Canadian Clock Museum, Deep River, Ontario

“By the late 1950s, several American designers were creating distinctive wall clocks based on a “ball and stick” concept. [These so-called “atomic” clocks represented electrons circling around the nucleus of an atom. This style may well have been triggered by the Soviet launch of the first man-made satellite, Sputnik.] Harry Snider followed suit with some standard versions of his Ball clock. Black and white were very common colours. A unique design developed by Harry and sold only by his second company (Snider Clock Mfg Co.) was their “Spider” model. This unusual clock was available finished in turquoise, black, and sandalwood (brown), and probably also white and pink. As you can see, the twelve metal arms holding the wood balls were curved to the front and contrasting-colour thumbtacks were used to create eyeball pupils as the hour markers. One museum visitor several years ago recognized this model on our wall because her grandmother had one back around 1960 – the image of twelve eyes staring down from the wall at a little girl was never forgotten!”

– Allan Symons, The Canadian Clock Museum

Sources:
– 
The evolution of Snider wall clock designs 1950 – 1976,  The Canadian Clock Museum, VirtualMuseums.ca 
–  A brief history of the Snider Clock Corporation and Snider Clock Mfg. Co.,  The Canadian Clock Museum, VirtualMuseums.ca 

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